Morning Prayer: Maundy Thursday

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Psalm: 102
Old Testament: Lamentations 2:10-18
New Testament: 1 Corinthians 10:14-17; 11:27-32

The cup of blessing that we bless, is it not a sharing in the blood of Christ? The bread that we break, is it not a sharing in the body of Christ? Because there is one bread, we who are many are one body, for we all partake of the one bread. (1 Cor 10:16-17)

Maundy Thursday is always an interesting Feast Day for me, especially growing up a Roman Catholic background. In that particular tradition, the emphasis for today is placed on the institution of the Lord’s Supper…..celebrating the fact that Jesus took ordinary things, and transformed them so that we might never be without His presence.

But gathering around the table has a greater significance than being fed for our own benefit. In sharing the Body and Blood of our Lord with others, we are united in a spiritual bond that cannot be broken. A bond which makes us not only fellow human beings…..but brothers and sisters who find ourselves in relationship with one another.

I don’t know about you……but I DEFINITELY know some folks in Churchland that I don’t particularly enjoy. Personalities clash, differences of opinion arise, and in some cases, that schism can manifest itself in fighting, arguments, and seeing that person as “somebody else….someone I don’t have to interact with”

Holy Thursday challenges us to sit with others that we don’t enjoy or get along with. Don’t forget: Even Judas was able to share in this sacred meal. 😉

As we enter into the Three Great Days heading towards the Resurrection, may we come to see ourselves in the stories of Scripture, and recognize that we are called to enter into God’s presence….. even when the images are gruesome and ones that we would rather ignore……It is only through suffering, service, and fellowship with sinners that the Paschal mystery can really happen. +

Evening Prayer: Eve of the Transfiguration of the Lord

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Psalm: 84
Old Testament: 1 Kings 19:1-12
New Testament: 2 Cor 3:1-9;18

The angel of the Lord came a second time, touched him, and said, ‘Get up and eat, otherwise the journey will be too much for you.’ He got up, and ate and drank; then he went in the strength of that food for forty days and forty nights to Horeb the mount of God. (1 Kings 19:7-8)

When most people read this passage from Kings, the focus is usually on the fact that God is present in the silence. That is all well and good…and an important excerpt for understanding God…but I find myself drawn to the angel’s words.

If you have been reading this blog for a while, you know that I place a big emphasis on santification and theosis in my writing and preaching.

But where do we get the strength to be transformed? Who gives us the insights to change our lives inside out and upside down? The angel reminds us tonight that all of these things come from God Himself.

Nothing we ever do comes strictly from our own efforts….but with the help and love of the One who made us so that:

All of us, with unveiled faces, seeing the glory of the Lord as though reflected in a mirror, are being transformed into the same image from one degree of glory to another (2 Cor 3:18a)

As we prepare to celebrate the Feast on which we see Christ as He truly is….I pray that God will remove the scales from our eyes…..to lift the veils of our own bias and ignorance…of our laziness and apathy….so that we can travel up the mountain to be see God’s glory in all creation; and make our way back down to bring that vision and life to those who are in darkness and lost in despair.

Praise to the Holy Trinity who gives us everything we need :). Amen, Alleluia! +

Morning Prayer: July 15th

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Psalm: 31
Old Testament: 1 Sam 21
New Testament: Acts 13:13-25

So the priest gave him the holy bread; for there was no bread there except the bread of the Presence, which is removed from before the Lord to be replaced by hot bread on the day it is taken away. (1 Sam 21:6)

Ever notice how the Old Testament is filled with people doing things that they aren’t supposed to do? Adam and Eve eat of the forbidden Tree…Cain kills his brother out of jealousy…Abraham deceives Pharaoh which leads to disease and famine for the king’s household….Jacob steals the birthright of his twin…and now we have a priest giving the Bread of the Presence to someone outside the Levitical family.

And yet….what do we find as God’s response to these events. God allows Adam to live, Cain is protected, Abraham is given a son, and Jacob becomes the namesake and patriarch of a nation.

God takes the things that we might perceive as unholy and transforms them into something…..not only good…..but great. 🙂 Definitely gives us food for thought when we get stuck in liturgical ruts….or feel that certain individuals should be restricted from the Lord’s Table because of their “bad” behaviour, non? +

Morning Prayer: Maundy Thursday

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Psalm: 102
Old Testament: Jeremiah 20:7-11
New Testament: 1 Corinthians 10:14-17; 11:27-32

Ever wonder why we say the General Confession before receiving the bread and the wine of the Eucharist??? We get that idea from Paul’s warning to the Corinthians this morning:

Whoever, therefore, eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be answerable for the body and blood of the Lord. Examine yourselves, and only then eat of the bread and drink of the cup. For all who eat and drink* without discerning the body,* eat and drink judgement against themselves. (1 Cor 10:27-29)

In confessing our sins to God, and by sharing the sign of peace with our brothers and sisters we are forgiven and reconciled. In those liturgical actions, any restraint from receiving Christ’s Body and Blood are shattered and broken.

Of course, it is not always necessary that the exact prayer of Confession be said…..but there is a real sense that one who approaches the altar should know what they are getting themselves into.

On the flip side, we must keep in mind that Jesus feasted with tax collectors and sinners…he never put any conditions on his hospitality. He simply welcomed them with loving arms. Asking that we–in turn–accept his love and free gift of grace. 🙂

In receiving Christ’s very Self and making it a part of our own bodies, we cannot help but be changed. We cannot help but receive the gifts of the Spirit and be given perfect remission of our faults and failings. For Christ died once for all. No matter how heinous your sins, they are both forgiven and forgotten in the name of Jesus.

By using ordinary things, God takes the fruits of the earth and makes them into something extraordinary. We too are made extraordinary by that spiritual food and drink…refashioned into a new creation that brings life, healing, and wholeness to the world.

So….as we celebrate this most Holy Thursday:

Come all you who love God and want to love God more.
Come, you who have tried to follow Jesus, and you who have failed.
Come, you who have been here many times, and you who have never been before.
Come, because it is Christ who invites you here.

Thanks be to God!+

Evening Prayer: April 8th

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Psalms: 107:1-32
Gospel: <a href="John 6:52-59
Patristic Reading: An excerpt from an Easter letter of St. Athanasius

Very truly, I tell you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you have no life in you. Those who eat my flesh and drink my blood have eternal life, and I will raise them up on the last day; for my flesh is true food and my blood is true drink (John 6:53-54)

This is the third straight day we have had readings about Jesus as the Bread of Life. I want to draw your attention to a nuance in the Greek that makes tonight’s passage especially striking.

The word translated as “eat” in this passage, is actually a much more specific verb in the Greek. In its proper context, the sentence reads more like this.

“Very truly, I tell you, unless you munch the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you have no life in you. Those who munch on my flesh and drink my blood have eternal life, and I will raise them up on the last day….”

In fact, it was this text that caused so much confusion in the ancient world. Romans thought that Christians were cannibals! 😛

While Christian theology has many different understandings of what it means to eat the flesh and drink the blood of our Lord…this mystery has been worked out most thoroughly and intentionally in the Sacrament of the Eucharist.

I could never hope to cover Eucharistic theology in one blog post; entire volumes have been written on the subject! But the very fact that Jesus uses such an intense verb to describe Eternal life I think leads us to a few interesting conclusions.

One is that living the faith is an *earthy* and lived experience. It is something that requires we get our hands dirty…..and to quite literally take a bite out of life.

Related to this idea is that our Christian heritage is an Incarnational heritage. At the heart of the Church’s salvific identity, there is a fundamental conviction that God and earth are united. One cannot be separated from the other…and that we experience God in the everyday things of life.

As Anglicans, we have held on to this sacramental understanding. In which the bread and wine are an outward and visible sign of an inward and invisible Grace.

We come to the Lord’s table in the assurance and hope that even though the bread and the wine seem completely ordinary (and even tasteless if you use styrofoam wafers)…they are actually something completely transcendant. The Bread is the Flesh of Christ…… to make our flesh clean…..to remind us that our bodies are temples of the Holy Spirit.

Likewise, the Wine is the Blood of Christ…..to cleanse our souls…and to remind us that any inner turmoil we are experiencing will be calmed by the still, small voice of the Spirit.

As we go to receive the Sacrament Sunday by Sunday….God is making a statement. God declares that we are a forgiven people…..a new creation….beloved children. ❤

In response, we unite our voices in prayer and praise for the way in which God has saved all of Creation through his Son…..May we always feed on Him in our hearts by faith with thanksgiving. +

Evening Prayer: April 6th

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Psalm: 119:121-144
Gospel: John 6:27-40
Patristic Reading: An excerpt from a letter of St. Maximus the Confessor

The bread of Life 🙂 (C’mon I have to have some fun with this blog)


Everything that the Father gives me will come to me, and anyone who comes to me I will never drive away; 38for I have come down from heaven, not to do my own will, but the will of him who sent me. (John 6:37-38)

Part of me is lazy…..but the more substantial part of me wants you to just read the Patristic reflection offered by Maximus tonight (scroll down to reading II once you click on the link.) It is written beautifully and certainly puts the Gospel lection in perspective. Jesus came to reconcile us to God, and so that God’s glory could be revealed through his words and his actions.

As is typical for John, the Jewish people are totally clueless and cannot understand the message. The irony is intentional both as a plot device for the narrative and as a way to call attention to God’s mission to the world. A wake up call to recognize the open arms with which the Father waits for us….and the joy that awaits us after the hard work of Repentance. The bread of Life can only be given to those who can accept that Jesus is ready to forgive, no matter what and that we are called to do the same.+

Evening Prayer: April 5th

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Psalms: 94
Gospel: John 6:16-27
Patristic Reading: An excerpt from a sermon by St. Leo the Great

Do not work for the food that perishes, but for the food that endures for eternal life, which the Son of Man will give you. For it is on him that God the Father has set his seal (John 6:27)

Sometimes music and images from Youtube can say it so much better than I can :)….Enjoy!

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